Posts Tagged ‘art-print’

I'd Bet Dollars To Donuts © Bonnie Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: I’d Bet Dollars To Donuts

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

I'd Bet Dollars To Donuts © Bonnie Chapa

I’d Bet Dollars To Donuts © Bonnie Chapa

“I’d Bet Dollars to Donuts” © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Special thanks to the Krumnow Family, owners of the Shipley’s Donuts in Temple for the “sweet” inspiration!  Home of the best donuts in all of TEXAS!
Created from an original photo Bonnie Feaster Chapa took in Temple, Texas.
Sizes 20×20 inches and larger are Limited Editions.
Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

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New Bonnie Chapa Art: Concrete Butterfly

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

Concrete Butterfly @ Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Concrete Butterfly @ Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Bonnie Feaster Chapa
Created from an original photo Bonnie Feaster Chapa took in San Antonio, Texas.

“Concrete Butterfly”
Full of colorful bits from yesterday, trashy rough edges cracked to define her purpose, exposed wings and deep pockets of truth. She faces the light and knows her direction. She’s taking it all with her, because even concrete butterflies can fly.

Hand signed Limited Edition by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

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Waco Hippodrome © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: “Waco Hippodrome”

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

“Waco Hippodrome” © Bonnie Feaster Chapa Story of the Waco Hippodrome Theatre below.

Created from an original picture taken by Bonnie Feaster Chapa, September 2014, at the Waco Hippodrome in Waco, Texas.

Construction began on the Hippodrome Theatre in 1913 after a group of Waco businessmen organized by Thomas P. Finnegan and Mayor J.P. Harrison garnered support for a downtown vaudeville theatre.

The Hippodrome Theatre’s opening night, February 7, 1914, featured a live seal act, a five-piece orchestra and a magic act on the bill. Tickets were ten cents for adults, five cents for children, and box seats were a quarter. The theatre was operated by Mr. H.P. Hulsey & known affectionately known by Wacoans as “Hulsey’s Hipp”. The Hippodrome Theatre was the place for road shows, vaudeville tours, movies and local talent shows and events.

As the vaudeville era came to an end, the Hippodrome Theatre became a Paramount-Publix silent movie theatre. As an affiliate of Paramount Pictures, the theatre served as a movie theatre until a fire in the projection booth in 1928 destroyed much of the front of the building, forcing a renovation of the facility.

The consequent renovation resulted in the Spanish Colonial Revival style that is still present in the building today. In 1929, Southern Enterprises leased the theatre to Louis Dent’s Waco Theatre, and management changed the name of the Hippodrome Theatre to Waco Theatre.

The facility remained in use as a movie theatre and performance venue while undergoing renovations in 1936, 1961 and 1971. During this time, a number of celebrities performed and visited the Waco Theatre. Elvis Presley performed on stage, as well as taking in a movie while stationed in Fort Hood. The largest crowd ever gathered at the Waco Theatre was over 10,000 people to see John Wayne in town to promote one of his pictures.

The Waco Theatre remained open until the late-1970’s, but an increasing number of customers turned to newer movie theatres in suburban areas, ultimately causing the theatre to shut its doors. The Waco Theatre remained unused until 1980, when the Junior League of Waco began the process of restoring the Waco Theatre. At the time, Waco was in need for a performing arts venue, and the empty Hippodrome Theatre fitted the bill.

Between 1981 and 1986, community volunteers, the Junior League of Waco, and the Cooper Foundation contributed $2.4 million dollars and countless hours of dedication to undertake the restoration. The Waco Hippodrome Theatre was reopened on February 28, 1987 and became listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. The facility was operated by the Waco Performing Arts Alliance and offered a variety of live theatre performances in the building until 2009-2010 when the Hippodrome Theatre once again closed its doors.

In December 2012, local developers Shane Turner and Cody Turner purchased the Hippodrome Theatre and began its current renovation. The theatre retained its classic look, but took on a few new changes. Inside the theatre, a retractable wall and movie screen was added to the balcony giving the building the capability to show two films simultaneously. The seating was refigured to be more stadium-like, as well as to give means for flexible seating with or without tables for dining. The second floor lobby has been renovated into a bar. An addition was constructed facing S. 8th Street that features two kitchens, a concession stand, a full-service restaurant and handicapped accessibility with restrooms on each level and an elevator to connect the floors.

While native Wacoans remember the Waco Theatre as a movie theatre, the Hippodrome Theatre has always been a performing arts center in one form or another. The new Hippodrome Theatre opening in 2014 will offer first-release films, along with classic films, live theatre, concerts, stand-up comedy, dance and much more. The Hippodrome Theatre is set to entertain Waco for another century.
Source: http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/1664

Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

Waco Hippodrome © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Waco Hippodrome © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Bahama Mamas © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: “Bahama Mamas”

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

I broke a cardinal rule of photography I was told with this image when I originally took this picture.  I cut that Mama’s head off.  Oh well, I wasn’t thinking of the rules when I turned around and saw 3 generations walking off the boardwalk out onto the beach at South Padre.

For a year, I worked on this trying to “make it better”.  Correct the layout, crop, trim, resize……I almost trashed it.  Because of what someone said and then one day I thought to myself, “Do you like it?  Yes, a whole, whole lot.  Then why do you care, Bonnie?”  Let it be what it is and what it is meant to be.  It is YOURS.  That is enough.”

And when it’s MINE…..I see love.  I see color.  I see togetherness.  I see a bond.  When I see things in an instant, if I am lucky enough to have my camera at that time, I get what I get when I can get it.  This is what I got: It’s mine and it’s fine.

This was instantly, “Bahama Mamas” (with no rules)

Break the “rules”.

Follow your gut instinct.

If you love it, don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t because of some “rules”.

Finally, and forever to stay this way, the way it was meant to be in 2014 from an original photo taken by Bonnie Feaster Chapa July 2012, at South Padre Island, Texas.

Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side
Bahama Mamas © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Fish Or Cut Bait © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: “Fish Or Cut Bait”

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

Coming back in from a boat ride on the Aqua Dog, an amphibious boat, out to Boca Chica Beach off South Padre Island, I looked up and saw this.  In a flash, it summed up for me the daily routines there in the marina.  So many colors and so much going on in a place that was so laid back and worry free.  The trip on the Aqua Dog itself ,was eventful.  They take you out on this boat with huge tires as big as a full grown man and drive the boat up on the beach and leave you there to see dolphins and collect shells and come get you later.  Well, they came back to get us and before we could leave this little remote island, we saw a dead dolphin, one of those huge tires on the boat got a flat, stuck in a sand dune and people from the marina had to come rescue us on another boat we had to swim out to to get back to South Padre.  2 kids, my almost drown camera, a dead dolphin and one memory to last a lifetime later, I thought to myself, “And we almost didn’t do this….damn, that was crazy fun.”
Sometimes we put off those things we want to do.  We talk about it, wish for it, dream about it.  We want to get away, but there is never a perfect time it seems.  There is never  a “perfect” time for anything and your “anything” may not be perfect.  So what!  You miss your opportunities sitting around waiting, wishing and dreaming.  Just get up and go.  There is an adventure waiting out there with your name on it.  Are you gonna fish, or cut bait?

Created in 2014 from an original photo taken by Bonnie Feaster Chapa July 2012, at South Padre Island, Texas.


Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

Fish Or Cut Bait © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

Floating In Yellow © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: “Floating In Yellow”

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

As soon as I saw this little boy, I immediately thought of the little girl in “Floating In Pink” I had done a couple of years before.  Just as she was at the time, he was casually floating in his yellow tube, not a care in the world.  Both he and she are seemingly able to take command of their space.  Yellow is the color of sunshine. It’s associated with joy, happiness, intellect, and energy. When I saw him floating there, that is exactly what I saw.  Floating in yellow sunshine.  Happy.

Created from an original photo taken by Bonnie Feaster Chapa August 2013, in Clearwater, Florida.


Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

Floating In Yellow © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

To See A World In A Grain Of Sand © Bonnie Feaster Chapa

New Bonnie Chapa Art: “To See A World In A Grain Of Sand”

Written by Bonnie Chapa on . Posted in Bonnie's Art Gallery

Created in 2014 from an original photo taken by Bonnie Feaster Chapa July 2012, at South Padre Island, Texas.

My family and I were at the beach and I turned around and saw this “moment”.  It was obvious it was this little girl’s first ever beach experience and her Mama was showing her the sand and reassuring her that those waves coming in and out were ok and there was nothing to be afraid of.

Two years later, I kept coming back to this seemingly, at the time, insignificant picture.  Little did I know there was so much more to see.  I mean, I knew, but I didn’t know.  As most things do that grab me, I finally gave in and started to work on it because if I didn’t, it was going to continue to haunt me.  As I got further along, I started to notice that the water and the white foam capped waves on the beach no longer looked like that to me.  It started to look like clouds in the sky and all at once it came together.  They were not on the beach.  They were in Heaven.  Both of them.  Literally.

I have always believed that before babies are born, they are up there in Heaven and before it’s their time here on Earth, God and Angels choose our babies and know every hair on their head, every wrinkle on their tiny toes.  They tell those babies everything there is to know about their waiting Mama that loves them, just as much as they are loved in Heaven.  They have a destiny, a purpose and it is given to them there in Heaven and those Angels show them, while innocent, unborn and all knowing, what they can expect here, in our small insignificant incomparable world as we know it.  This Angel is showing this little girl, by placing her hand on the sand that she can, in fact, as the title of this piece suggests, see the world in a grain of sand.  She is Heaven sent.  For how long or for what purpose, only God and the Angels know the answer.

Auguries of Innocence is a poem written by William Blake.  An augury is a sign of what will happen in the future; an omen.  If you read the whole poem, try thinking of it as if this Angel is telling this baby girl the ways of the world she is about to enter.  In the poem, Blake pairs things with a broader vision, an expansive experience where innocence collides with corruption.   The first stanza in the poem starts out:

To see a world in a grain of sand

And a heaven in a wild flower,

Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,

and eternity in an hour.

Can we really see the world in a grain of sand?  I believe we were shown how but sometimes, we forget how to see.  Can we hold infinity in the palm of our hands?  Our attention is lost in the endless blur called LIFE.  Do you see the sacred in the mundane and the profound in the ordinary?  It’s in the noticing.  The smallest thing can be a gateway to an experience of extraordinary proportions if you just practice noticing.  Everyday there are countless natural miracles around us.  Those miracles are there waiting for us to see and notice them in our world.  Angels and babies, beaches and Heaven…….greatness, perfection and virtue exists.  It’s all right there, in just one grain of sand.

To read the entire poem, Auguries of Innocence by William Blake, click here.
Hand signed by Bonnie Feaster Chapa.  Art Available At Bonnie Chapa’s Etsy Store Ridin On The Right Side

To See A World In A Grain Of Sand © Bonnie Feaster Chapa